Vineyard Church Cult

    vineyard church

  • The Association of Vineyard Churches, also known as the Vineyard Movement, is a neocharismatic evangelical Christian denominationDespite the fact that some might see denominational labels as divisive, the founder of the movement John Wimber said “The Association of Vineyard Churches – for better

    cult

  • A system of religious veneration and devotion directed toward a particular figure or object
  • A relatively small group of people having religious beliefs or practices regarded by others as strange or sinister
  • A misplaced or excessive admiration for a particular person or thing
  • followers of an exclusive system of religious beliefs and practices
  • fad: an interest followed with exaggerated zeal; “he always follows the latest fads”; “it was all the rage that season”
  • followers of an unorthodox, extremist, or false religion or sect who often live outside of conventional society under the direction of a charismatic leader

vineyard church cult

vineyard church cult – Building Your

Building Your Cult: Power, Politics and People
Building Your Cult: Power, Politics and People
This book deals with the art and science of protecting and promoting your own interests. It is about reaching that pentacle of accomplishment where you have groups of people devoted to you, your goals and your ambitions. In other words, it is about the politics of life. It is about making your own cult. No one has to build a cult from this book. That’s a personal decision and you’ll get some very useful tools to do that… if you decide. What this book should do is help you to create a personal sense of purpose. More often when someone talks about a sense of purpose or a feeling of destiny they are met with cynicism. People generally don’t even have a language to understand the concept of purpose and destiny. Yes, we have plans and goals and problems to solve and we work to solve those problems but there are few who can say they are driven by a sense of purpose. Those who are are usually are live like unstoppable forces of nature. If you have to wait to find your sense of purpose then it will likely never happen. Right NOW you are in the perfect place to choose your purpose. When you do, life gains a clearer perspective and you can do the ordinary and mundane acts of daily life with more vigor and joy because everything is connected by your sense of purpose.

Bury St Edmunds Abbey 1

Bury St Edmunds Abbey 1
When, in the early tenth century, the relics of the martyred king, St Edmund, were translated from Hoxne to Beodricsworth, afterwards known as Bury St Edmunds,[1] the site had already been in religious use for nearly three centuries. To the small household of Benedictine monks who guarded the shrine the surrounding lands were granted in 1020, during the reign of Canute, monks were introduced from St Benet’s Abbey under the auspices of the Bishop of Elmham and Dunwich. Two of them became Bury’s first two abbots, Ufi, prior of Holme, (d. 1044), who was consecrated abbot by the Bishop of London, and Leofstan (1044-65). After Leofstan’s death, the king appointed his physician Baldwin to the abbacy (1065-97). Baldwin rebuilt the church, and reinterred St Edmund’s body there with great ceremony in 1095. The cult made the richly endowed abbey[2] a popular destination for pilgrimages.

The Abbey of St Edmund at Bury St Edmunds was built in the eleventh and twelfth centuries of a cruciform plan, with its head (or apse) pointed east. The shrine of St Edmund stood behind the high altar. The abbey was much enlarged and rebuilt during the twelfth century. At some 505 feet long, and spanning 246 ft across its westerly transept, Bury St Edmunds abbey church was one of the largest in the country. St James’s Church, now St Edmundsbury Cathedral, was finished around 1135. St Mary’s Church was first built around 1125, and then rebuilt in the Perpendicular style between 1425-35.
Abbeygate, rebuilt in the mid-14th century

Abbey Gate, opening onto the Great Courtyard, was the secular entrance which was used by the Abbey’s servants. In 1327, it was destroyed during the Great Riot by the local people, who were angry at the power of the monastery, and it had to be rebuilt. Norman Gate dates from 1120-48 and was designed to be the gateway for the Abbey Church and it is still the belfry for the Church of St James, the present cathedral of Bury St Edmunds. This four-storey gate-hall is virtually unchanged and is entered through a single archway. Great Gate is an impressive 14th century stone gatehouse, designed to be the gateway for the Great Courtyard. One of the best surviving examples of its type, this two storey gate-hall is entered through a single archway which retains its portcullis. The Crankles was the name of the fishpond near the river Lark. The vineyard was first laid out in the 1200s. There were three breweries in the Abbey as each monk was entitled to eight pints a day.

The Abbey’s charters granted extensive lands and rights in Suffolk. The Abbey held the gates of Bury St Edmunds; they held wardships of all orphans, whose income went to the Abbot until the orphan reached maturity; they pressed their rights of corvée. During the 13th century general prosperity blunted the resistance of burghers and peasants; in the 14th century, however, the monks encountered hostility from the local populace. Throughout the summer of 1327, the monastery suffered extensively, as several monks lost their lives in riots, and many buildings were destroyed. The hated charters and debtors’ accounts were seized and triumphantly torn to shreds. Already faced with considerable financial strain, the abbey went further into decline during the first half of the 15th century. In 1431 the west tower of the abbey church collapsed. Two years later Henry VI moved into residence at the abbey for Christmas, and was still enjoying monastic hospitality four months later. More trouble arose in 1446 when the Duke of Gloucester died in suspicious circumstances after his arrest, and in 1465 the entire church was burnt out by an accidental fire. Largely rebuilt by 1506, the abbey of Bury St Edmunds settled into a quieter existence until dissolution in 1539. Subsequently stripped of all valuable building materials and artefacts, the abbey ruins were left as a convenient quarry for local builders.

The ruins are owned by English Heritage and managed by St Edmundsbury Borough Council.

The Abbey Gardens surrounding the ruins had an "Internet bench" installed in 2001, which people could use to connect laptops to the Internet. It was the first bench of its kind

Tulare Vineyard Church 6

Tulare Vineyard Church 6
Tulare Vineyard Church
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